The Saskatoon Agreement

Doctors returned to work after the Saskatoon Agreement, but hostilities remained for a long time. Patients were upset by the desertion of their doctors, while doctors refused the government`s participation in medical care. Nevertheless, a 1965 survey showed that most doctors were in favor of continuing the plan. The government has brought in doctors from the U.K., the U.S. and other provinces to fill community clinics that were created to meet the demand for health care. A rally in support of doctors outside Saskatchewan`s legislature in Regina drew some 4,000 people on July 11, one-tenth the number organizers had hoped. [2] In mid-July, some striking doctors returned to work. Lord Taylor, a British physician who helped implement the National Health Service in the United Kingdom, was appointed as mediator and the Saskatoon Agreement, which ended the strike, was signed on July 23, 1962. As a result of the agreement, changes were introduced to allow doctors to unsubscribe from Medicare and increase the fees paid to doctors under the plan and increase the number of doctors who sit on the Medical Care Insurance Commission. Until 1965, most doctors preferred the continuation of Medicare. [1] A temporary agreement on pandemic physical services has been put in place for physicians during the pandemic response. The Ministry of Health, the Saskatchewan Medical Association and the Saskatchewan Health Authority have set the rates for agreements during the pandemic to allow for stability and flexibility in medical services and to facilitate the reintegration of physicians if necessary. More information is available: by mid-July, much of the aid to the KOD had dissolved.

Some doctors have returned to work; the strength of the strike has been consummated. Lord Taylor, a physician who was actively involved in the establishment of the British health care system, was transported by the government to Saskatchewan. He acted as a mediator and the 2 pages signed an agreement in Saskatoon on July 23, 1962. The Saskatchewan Medical Care Insurance Bill was introduced on October 13, 1961 by the Saskatchewan legislature and passed in November and was endowed with Royal Saxons. To this end, Douglas had resigned as premier to lead the newly created federal New Democratic Party and was replaced as provincial premier and leader of the CCF by Woodrow Lloyd,[1] who was under enormous pressure to withdraw the plan. [3] In an attempt to reach a compromise, Lloyd delayed the introduction of Medicare from April to July 1962. [2] The Medicare Plan was announced in 1959 by Saskatchewan Premier Tommy Douglas in a speech during the Birch Hills by-election campaign. [2] This was the main theme of the 1960 provincial election won by his co-operational Commonwealth Federation government. A commission was mandated by the government to make recommendations for the implementation of the plan and met with opposition from the Saskatchewan College of Physicians and Surgeons, who testified that doctors would not cooperate with a mandatory government-led plan. . . .